Virginity & heritability

Genes may time loss of virginity:

As genetic determinism goes, the new findings are modest. Segal’s team found that genes explain a third of the differences in participants’ age at first intercourse – which was, on average, a little over 19 years old. By comparison, roughly 80% of variations in height across a population can be explained by genes alone.

On the other hand, conservative social mores might delay a teen’s first sexual experience, causing scientists to low-ball the effect of genes. Indeed, Segal’s team noticed a less pronounced genetic effect among twins born before 1948, compared with those who came of age in the 1960s or later.

As for the specific genes involved, another team previously found that a version of a gene encoding a receptor for the neurotransmitter dopamine is associated with age at first intercourse. Others have linked the same version of the gene – called DRD4 – to impulsive, risk-taking behaviour.

The paper is Age at first intercourse in twins reared apart: Genetic influence and life history events.

FuturePundit notes:

The team found a weaker effect from genes with people born before 1948. This supports an argument I’ve made here previously: the breakdown of old cultural constraints on behavior frees up people to follow genetically driven desires and impulses. We become more genetically driven as external constraints weaken.

When you remove the strength of environmental parameters from the equation it naturally results in a greater salience of heritable ones. Ergo, the logic whereby you can make the case that in a perfect meritocracy there will be much stronger genetic sorting by class (via assortative mating, etc.).

Related: DRD4 and virginity.

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