11 thoughts on “20% of white non-Hispanic liberals are “pro-life”(ish)

  1. “Many conservatives, especially intellectuals, are atheists, but keep their mouths shut in public out of ‘respect’ for the major viewpoint”

    I suspect that a fair number of them have feelings of “well, I can’t personally believe, but churches do a lot of good work, and provide community, and it seems useful for those people.” In other words, for many the respect is not worthy of sneer quotes. Hard to think there’s an analogous view for abortion apostates.

    The recent book Democracy for Realists by Achen and Bartles has, inter alia, some more information about how abortion views have changed over time. (Unsurprisingly, men whether Democrats or Republicans have been more likely to shift views to match their party, as other issues are more salient to them.)

  2. I suspect that a fair number of them have feelings of “well, I can’t personally believe, but churches do a lot of good work, and provide community, and it seems useful for those people.”

    That is my sense as well regarding many atheist conservatives, something along the lines of Friedrich Hayek’s stance: “I am not personally religious, but I respect religion.”

    I believe most religious conservatives accept this, as they seek respect for their theistic views rather than demand conformity. This is certainly my view, speaking as a highly religious conservative.

    In that regard, I think the dynamic for pro-life leftists is different, because non-conformity on this matter often invites disbelief and, eventually, attacks from their ideological teammates

  3. I believe most religious conservatives accept this, as they seek respect for their theistic views rather than demand conformity. This is certainly my view, speaking as a highly religious conservative.

    in general true, especially in elite circles. OTOH, a subset of conservatives did assert that christian faith necessarily followed from conservatism and vice versa. seemed ludicrous to me, but this was a view common in the late 2000s in some quarters (i encountered it when i started secular right blog).

    that view seems to be mostly gone now in 2017, but i think that’s a function of increased secularity in society.

  4. in general true, especially in elite circles. OTOH, a subset of conservatives did assert that christian faith necessarily followed from conservatism and vice versa. seemed ludicrous to me, but this was a view common in the late 2000s in some quarters (i encountered it when i started secular right blog).

    Heh, Catholic conservatives have always kept company with “virtuous pagans” unlike, say, evangelical Protestant conservatives. After all, we “worship that pagan, Aristotle” as one Protestant conservative leader once said of Catholics.

  5. yeah, i think most of the critiques came from a certain type of evangelical protestant. it was a weird mix of americanism, low church protestantism, and implicit whiteness i think.

  6. 2 Corinthians 6:17

    Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you,

  7. In European conservatism, there was a subtradition of “I am not Christian, but I am Catholic” (Charles Maurras, I think) – meaning something like “I don’t believe in God nor in the Bible, but I think we need an organized and established Church to avoid the collapse of civilization”. Perhaps this point of view is difficult to transpose to a Protestant culture (Protestantism, with its perpetual fissions about the correct interpretation of the Bible, is probably less attractive for someone who is nor personally religious but likes the institution of the church).

  8. That’s funny. I like it. It has style.

    “I wish to reject Christianity, but I want to reject an orthodox and regimented one.”

  9. @iffen

    That’s wildly out of context. The verse preceding clarifies the statement:
    2 Corinthians 6:16-17
    “16 What agreement can exist between the temple of God and idols? For we are the temple of the living God. As God has said: “I will live with them and walk among them, and I will be their God, and they will be My people. 17 Therefore come out from among them and be separate, says the Lord. Touch no unclean thing, and I will receive you.”

  10. From Wiki:

    Protestant Reformation

    16th-century iconoclasm in the Protestant Reformation. Relief statues in St. Stevenskerk in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, were attacked and defaced in the Beeldenstorm.

    Looting of the Churches of Lyon by the Calvinists in 1562 by Antoine Caron.

    Destruction of religious images in Zurich, 1524

    Some of the Protestant reformers, in particular Andreas Karlstadt, Huldrych Zwingli and John Calvin, encouraged the removal of religious images by invoking the Decalogue’s prohibition of idolatry and the manufacture of graven (sculpted) images of God. As a result, individuals attacked statues and images. However, in most cases, civil authorities removed images in an orderly manner in the newly reformed Protestant cities and territories of Europe.

    Significant iconoclastic riots took place in Zurich (in 1523), Copenhagen (1530), Münster (1534), Geneva (1535), Augsburg (1537), Scotland (1559), Rouen (1560) and Saintes and La Rochelle (1562).[12] In 1549, radical Protestant preachers in London incited a mob to destroy many of the interior decorations in Old St Paul’s Cathedral.[citation needed]

  11. 2 Corinthians 6:17

    Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you,

    You know that we Catholics aren’t biblical literalists, right? Besides, how would the Corinthians have been converted in the first place without Christians dwelling first amongst the still-pagan Corinthians, eh?

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