The less intelligent and uneducated really don’t tolerate unpopular views

When looking at the General Social Survey one of the most striking things is how much more the more educated and intelligent are in terms of accepting unpopular views. Since 2008 and the SPKMSLM variable has asked about anti-American hatred preached by Muslim clerics in the United States:

… consider a Muslim clergyman who preaches hatred of the United States.

If such a person wanted to make a speech in your community preaching hatred of the United States, should he be allowed to speak, or not?

The ideological breakdown is what you’d expect it to be, and tolerance for this sort of speech is low, at about 40% of Americans.

  

In case you are wondering, the impact of intelligence still matters after you correct for education. I ran a quick & dirty logistic regression, and you can see that below (in case you care, being a woman is associated with less tolerance for free speech here, and political ideology doesn’t matter much once you take into account religiosity):

9 thoughts on “The less intelligent and uneducated really don’t tolerate unpopular views

  1. As an added variable, would it matter whether or not there were a large first- or second-generation Muslim immigrant population in the area?

  2. With a Muslim population straight from the third world this would be most unwise

    It helps to have some testosterone and to not be autistic

  3. How would you square these results with Anatoly Karlin’s GSS results showing that Asians are the least likely to allow people to speak on any number of issues? Sampling effect of some sort? (The assumption being that high-IQ Asians would have among the highest WORDSUM scores and number of graduate degrees.)

  4. Seth Largo – this is one more reason to control the results for ethnicity, to avoid confounding effects.

    But Asians are probably so few that don’t affect the results.

  5. Razib,

    This maybe a troll question but I couldn’t resist due to the timeliness of it. The GSS doesn’t really ask about people’s opinion on the degree of influence heredity has on, say, racial differences in intelligence or gender differences in certain abilities. If you were to hazard a guess, which “sides of the spectrum” would come up with the most/more “scientifically sound” answer as of 2017? The least educated/intelligent side or the most educated/intelligent side?

  6. If you were to hazard a guess, which “sides of the spectrum” would come up with the most/more “scientifically sound” answer as of 2017? The least educated/intelligent side or the most educated/intelligent side?

    perhaps less? though huge swaths of the public don’t take an interest in these issues so fall back on ‘common sense.’ so difference might be smaller than you’d think (especially on sex differences).

  7. I think asking University graduates “Should a Christian pastor be allowed to preach hatred”, would give an entirely different result.

  8. Change the question to “consider a Muslim clergyman who preaches hatred of the United States.

    If such a person wanted to make a speech in your community preaching hatred of the United States, should he be allowed to speak, or not?”

    To “consider a christian clergyman who preaches hatred of Muslims. If such a person wanted to make a speech in your community preaching hatred of the Umma, should he be allowed to speak, or not?”

    Results would invert. Different prejudices not differing views on free speech.

  9. “It helps to have some testosterone”

    Apparently not, since women give the answer you want much more frequently.

    “Results would invert. Different prejudices not differing views on free speech.”

    Really? You would have the smartest people saying free speech should not be permitted, independent of their political views?

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