28 thoughts on “Open Thread, 10/08/2017

  1. Today, it was a sunny 75 degrees here in Denver. Tomorrow we will have two inches of snow and temperatures below freezing. Everyone is hustling to shut down swamp coolers and sprinkler systems and to activate back flow preventers to prevent burst water lines.

  2. Does anyone know when Charles Murray’s new book (in progress) on the subject of the human genome project coming out? Any details about it at all? I heard him in an interview a few months ago briefly mention he was working on it.

  3. The recent papers on Africa, about movement of pastoralists and horticulturalists from north to south, has made me think of other prehistorical north-south migrations.

    – Early Chinese agriculturalists moved to southern China/SE Asia
    – Middle Eastern agriculturalists moved south into India and North Africa (though this was a broadly east-west movement)
    – Indo-Europeans moved from the steppe to Anatolia, the Middle East, and India
    – The aforementioned African pastoralists and farmers
    – Austronesians moved from Taiwan to more southerly islands
    – Amerindians moved all the way down to the tip of South America
    – Any I’m missing?

    What ramifications does this have for Jared Diamond’s thesis that north/south movement is more difficult than east/west?

  4. Yayoi rice farmers moved from the Korean peninsula up through the Japanese islands, so that was south to north, more or less.

  5. Razib – there’s this: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/09/19/190843

    “The gateway into Remote Oceania: new insights from genome-wide data.”

    Don’t know if you have had time to read it or plan to blog it. They use a lot of statistical methods I’m just not familiar with, so although I have given it a close read, I find it pretty overwhelming and hard to get my head around.

  6. So… has anyone done data dredging for ROH versus BMI? Are interbreed populations better at keeping their weight under control? Does out breeding increase the probability that you will be expressing an allele that doesn’t work well with your populations typical diet?

    Cheer, Guy

  7. I don’t think Diamond meant people couldn’t move between north and south, but that their knowledge and bio-resources were less likely to constructively add to the knowledge and bio-resources of the locals.

  8. Visited San Antonio and Austin recently. Austin had better food, but I was pleasantly surprised by San Antonio. I enjoyed the River Walk and the historical sites, particularly the Spanish Missions. San Antonio also seemed more laid back and peaceful.

    It didn’t help that there were 3 accidents on 35 en route to Austin. And we weren’t in Austin for more than 10 minutes when a tall, disheveled man came up to us asking if we had chocolate cookies, because he had “already had two peanut butter cookies already today. And really needed a chocolate one.”

  9. The new George RR Martim fake history book is coming out tomorrow! “The Sons of the Dragon” is about the reign of Aenys I and Maegor “the cruel” Targaryen. And about the next AISOAF books… well, just give up, the series won’t ever be finished. Well, at least there is the new Stormlight Archive book coming, more safe high fantasy novel, but, still good, I need to finish the Words of Radiance…

  10. The fresh out of college staff auditor I’m currently supervising told me tonight when I mentioned, “reading a blog,” that this made me sound really old.

  11. “Middle Eastern agriculturalists moved south into India and North Africa (though this was a broadly east-west movement)” – I’d quibble here. North Africa is very much E-W from the Fertile Crescent (and it didn’t move further South because the seasons in the Sahel are wrong for Fertile Crescent crops without region specific domesticate selection). Southern India’s Neolithic revolution arrived much later (ca. 2500 BCE v. ca. 6000 BCE for the Indus River Valley), and had African Sahel and Ethiopian crops as much as it did the Fertile Crescent package that took hold in the IVC, while Northern India including the parts of the IVC that thrived the most, had climates more similar to the Fertile Crescent.

    The Indo-Europeans when they arrived in South Asia also weren’t all that disruptive to the food production technologies used there. For example, curry quite similar to the modern culinary specialty of the region is a pre-IE staple of the IVC culture, while Southern Indian crops likewise remained similar to the original South Indian Neolithic package after the IE migration into the region with more shifting due to Munda influences from SE Asia.

    It appears that pastoralists have an easier go of N-S movement than horticulturalists. Herders migrated to South Africa long before Bantu farmers did. Similarly, the potato took forever to move north from South America (I’m not even sure that it did at all in the pre-Columbian era), even though it can grow perfectly well in parts of North America. Also, hunter-gatherers at some points in history seemed to have an easier time with N-S movement than horticulturalists.

    With respect to Taiwan, recall that once you cross the equator from the North, climates start getting more similar to your starting point. For example, Madagascar is actually pretty similar in distance from the equator to Formosa.

  12. The fresh out of college staff auditor I’m currently supervising told me tonight when I mentioned, “reading a blog,” that this made me sound really old.

    lol

  13. Asian livestock are known from Egypt about 6200 BC and rapidly spread to Sudan. They entered Kenya only about 3000-2500 BC and reached the Cape around maybe the beginning of the CE. It took a very long time. Sahelian crops reached India long before they got to the equivalent climate belt on the other side of the Equator.

  14. Andrew – If Aboriginal Australians are anything to go by, H-Gs take to nomadic pastoralism like ducks to water, far more so than to sedentary farming or horticulture. It’s just a replication of their normal lifestyle, pretty much. And on horseback, it’s a replication but easier/more comfortable and more effective. Aboriginal people took to horse riding as readily as Plains Indians did.

  15. For those of you who are interested in gaining a background in Anthropological Genetics, I would recommend Mark Stoneking’s new textbook “Molecular Anthropology”…very up to date and covers a lot of ground in efficient and didactic prose.

  16. Ancestors of historic Plains Indians included foragers, farmers, and in between. Arguably the foragers (e.g. Comanches, Blackfoot) and marginal farmers (e.g. Sioux, Cheyenne) actually did better than the more full-time farmers (e.g. Pawnees, Mandans), because they went into horse nomadism whole-heartedly, while the village farmers kept themselves tied themselves down more. That’s kind of speculative though.

  17. Did keto take for you? Don’t recall seeing any updates since you said you were past the keto flu. I need to lose 20 to 30 lbs, but my last attempt at it a few years ago with zero carbs was surprisingly ineffective. Also have a family history of heart disease and difficulty shaking off the conventional wisdom.

    Having another child and not sure how much provisioning I’ll do thru amazon, but intend to start paying you back for all the book recommendations here and on goodreads over the years.

    Cheers

  18. Did keto take for you? Don’t recall seeing any updates since you said you were past the keto flu. I need to lose 20 to 30 lbs, but my last attempt at it a few years ago with zero carbs was surprisingly ineffective. Also have a family history of heart disease and difficulty shaking off the conventional wisdom.

    the problem is the social aspect. hard to socialize with friends when you are keto. so i gave up but am still envious. i may go back to it at some point.

    Having another child and not sure how much provisioning I’ll do thru amazon, but intend to start paying you back for all the book recommendations here and on goodreads over the years.

    thanks! i easily beat the average payouts by medium with pretty low key referrals

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/medium-opens-subscription-program-to-all-writers-1507651200?mod=e2twcmo

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